Concentrated growth factor application in alveolar ridge preservation on anterior teeth. A split-mouth, randomized, controlled clinical trial


Submitted: 1 August 2023
Accepted: 2 October 2023
Published: 12 October 2023
Abstract Views: 259
PDF: 172
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Authors

  • H. Assadi 1Department of Periodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, Islamic Republic of.
  • M. Asadi Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz university of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, Islamic Republic of. https://orcid.org/0009-0001-6164-6695
  • M. Sadighi Assistant Professor of Periodontology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, Islamic Republic of.
  • M. Faramarzi Department of Periodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, Islamic Republic of.
  • M. Kouhsoltani ⁴Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, Islamic Republic of.

Aim This clinical trial aimed to evaluate the effects of concentrated growth factors (CGF) on ridge socket and soft tissue preservation, as well as pain management, following the extraction of anterior teeth in a split-mouth setting.
Materials and methods Forty-five candidates of anterior teeth implant therapy were selected for this clinical, split-mouth trial and 39 patients completed the study. CGF was prepared from the patients venous blood using specialized equipment. Teeth were extracted atraumatically, and then one of the extraction sockets randomly received CGF, and the other was left to heal naturally. Postoperatively, pain according to the visual analog scale (VAS), soft tissue healing based on a modified healing index (HI) and overall well-being were evaluated in a 7-days follow up. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to assess alveolar bone changes immediately after extraction and at two months post-extraction.
Results The application of CGF resulted in significantly reduced bone resorption in horizontal widths of 1, 3 and 5 mm under the crest(P < 0.01) as well as buccolingual and mesiodistal widths of the ridge(P < 0.001) compared to natural healing. Additionally, CGF showed better pain management, with significantly lower pain levels on days 2, 3 and 4 (p < 0.05). Soft tissue healing was also significantly improved in the CGF group on day 7 (p < 0.001).
Conclusion The application of CGF in alveolar sockets following tooth extraction showed promising results in maintaining alveolar bone, facilitating soft tissue healing and enhancing pain management. These findings provide support for the potential role of CGF in the success of implant therapy. Nevertheless, further investigation is necessary to understand the underlying mechanisms and optimize its clinical usage.


Supporting Agencies

Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Assadi, H., Asadi, M., Sadighi, M., Faramarzi, M., & Kouhsoltani, M. (2023). Concentrated growth factor application in alveolar ridge preservation on anterior teeth. A split-mouth, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Journal of Osseointegration, 15(4), 249–255. https://doi.org/10.23805/JO.2023.596

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